What To Do After Your Cancer Diagnosis

Surgery, chemotherapy, radiation and hormone therapy, are all treatments used to cure or relieve the symptoms of different types of cancer. Surgery normally involves complete removal of the tumor. The purpose of chemotherapy is to kill or stop the growth of cancerous cells, without affecting normal cells. Radiation is also aimed at inhibiting the growth of cancer cells.

When you first receive your cancer diagnosis, get as many facts as you can about it. Try to gather as much useful, basic information as you can about the type of cancer you have. What kind of cancer is it? Where is it? Has it spread? How will it be treated?

You should surround yourself with loved ones when you are fighting cancer. They will be able to give you encouragement when you need it or just be there to support you through the tough times. It is important to know that you are loved and that you would be missed if you did not fight.

There are many stigmas with cancer that still exist today. People will often wonder if cancer is contagious, if those with cancer can perform as well as someone without cancer, of if cancer patients will be offended at the very mention of the disease. Try to eliminate these stigmas among your friends and family if they arise.

Many people still believe old myths about cancer. They may fear that your disease is something that is contagious, or that you can no longer perform your job at work. Make it a point to be completely transparent and candid.

One of the best cancer-prevention tips you can ever use is to check out your family’s medical history in detail. Most people who contract cancer have genetic markers that make it more likely to grow and spread. Know and understand your family’s medical history and you can do more to prevent cancer.

As a cancer survivor, you should be making plans to permanently monitor the long-term effects of the treatment you have completed. Some treatments will put you at a higher risk for cardiovascular issues and even a return of the cancer, so be sure that you speak with your doctor and make plans to monitor the effects of your previous treatments.

All people who have had cancer should understand that it can always come back bigger, meaner and stronger. You have to deal with this fear now so that you are better prepared if in fact the cancer does return. Do not assume that you will be ready to deal with it the second time just because you dealt with it the first time. Prepare yourself accordingly.

As a preventative measure, some women who are genetically predisposed to breast cancer, may have a mastectomy. Chemotherapy is often able to kill cancerous cells, but it also affects normal cells leading to anemia, hair loss and other side effects. Hormone therapy can sometimes cause certain types of tumors to regress. New treatments are being researched and developed on a continuous basis.